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400 N Congress Ave

Suite: 130

West Palm Beach, FL 33401

 

Telephone:   +1 888 607 3555

E-mail: info@carbolosicenergy.com

 

"A Sugar-Sweet EB-5 Opportunity"

The information contained herein is for informational purposes only and does not constitute or form part of an offer to sell or solicitation of any offer to buy securities or a recommendation to invest in the proposed Project. Any decision to purchase or subscribe for securities should be made solely on the basis of information contained in a final offering memorandum, and related subscription agreement and limited partnership agreement, (collectively, the “Offering Documents”), delivered in connection with the Project.

Market Demand

Introducing the CTS™ Process

Cellulosic sugar is in high demand and used in the manufacturing of Ethanol, Bio-Diesel, Bio-Plastics and other industrial applications.  In fact, global cellulosic ethanol demand is expected to increase from just over 14 million gallons in 2012 to more than 412 million gallons in 2020.  The Patented Carbolosic technology provides a "green" and inexpensive method of meeting this massive increase in demand.

 

 

Global Cellulosic Ethanol Demand

2012

2020

Year

500M

0M

125M

250M

375M

How CTS™ Works

Market Demand

Growing Infrastructure

How CTS™ Works

Market Demand

Growing Infrastructure

Cellulosic biofuels are mandated by Congress and the EPA and only exist when produced by using Cellulosic sugars.  There are currently very few commercially viable sources of cellulosic sugars available on the market today.  CTS™ sugar is uniquely positioned to be one of the only commercially viable cellulosic sugars to meet the Federal RFS2 cellulosic mandate for ethanol.  Besides being cheaper than conventional sugar or corn starch, CTS sugars offer a number of tangible benefits to ethanol and other fermentation plant operators.

Cellulosic sugar can also be refined into edible table sugar and a variety of other consumer and feed products. Lignin, a byproduct of the conversation process, has tremendous value on its own or can be further processed into fine chemicals and additives.